Greetings

Well, this is the first post.  More of a test than anything.  More information will be forthcoming but I wanted to get the canned “Hello World” post off of the site.  This site will be dedicated to discussions regarding business management and organizational behavior and might even poke fun at some of the business “buzzwords” that have become so cliché.

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4 responses to “Greetings

  1. This type of behavior is seen more often as people get older. I have found that I learn more when things go wrong than when things go right. After that discovery, I realized the most important question becomes, “Why not try that, after all, how much damage can I do?” I find that simple question causes panic among managers and co-workers alike, much to my amusement. But when you really think about the question, how much damage can you do? A list of things that could go wrong can be formed and more importantly, a method of preventing those things from going wrong and a way to recover if it still goes wrong.

  2. I suppose it depends on whether you’re asking “how much damage can I do” with the specific purpose of eliciting panic. I have a co-worker that does that very thing. Obviously experimentation is a good thing in business, so long as the risks associated with the experiment are commensurate to the reward of its success.

  3. >Obviously experimentation is a good thing in business, so long as the risks
    >associated with the experiment are commensurate to the reward of its
    >success.

    So the only risk worth taking is one that will always be successful? Where’s the learning opportunity in that? In that instance the gain will only be incremental not revolutionary nor evolutionary.

    >I suppose it depends on whether you’re asking “how much damage can I do”
    >with the specific purpose of eliciting panic.

    Is the person an “accident looking for a place to happen?” or are the co-workers afraid of big changes? Perhaps it is a control issue for the co-workers and management. That’s just sad….

    • I’m not suggesting that the only risk worth taking is one that will certainly be successful. That wouldn’t be risk at all, would it? I’m asserting that the only risk worth takingin business is one that has the possibility of being successful and of producing something of indentifiable value. I’m uncertain of the merits of pure experimentation in business. I’m sure there are exceptions, but the garden variety business usually doesn’t possess the resources necessary to flesh out every hypothesis posited. However, if your business stands to make some type of substantial gain, be it of a monetary or efficiency value, then by all means, experiment away. But businesses that throw large amounts of resources into untenable experiments don’t stay in business very long. I’m not suggesting the stifling of ingenuity, but rather the measure of it. This doesn’t discount incremental gains, but it does require that there is some mechanism for measurement. Even incremenal gains should be measurable to some degree.

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